MARMOREAL IS AN ENGINEERED MARBLE FOR ARCHITECTURAL SURFACES DEVELOPED IN COLLABORATION WITH THE BRITISH DESIGNER MAX LAMB.

Marmoreal Black 60x60 100%

Marmoreal is offered in two colourways; one with a white background, the other black. Each version is composed of four classical Italian marbles and is a material exploration that celebrates the individual qualities of these stones while acknowledging that their combination leads to something even more compelling. Suitable for interior and exterior architectural surfaces, this large-aggregate, pre-cast marble terrazzo offers an original material language with strong visual values. It skilfully balances fifteenth-century craft traditions with modern engineered-stone technologies. The word ‘marmoreal’ means ‘marble-like’; this Marmoreal is composed of approximately 95 percent marble and 5 percent polyester resin binders.

FORMATS + FINISHES

Marmoreal is available in a range of standard dimensions and finishes that suit the randomness of the material yet give the impression of a continuous surface. The smaller 300 ✕ 300mm tiles provide the flexibility to install in small spaces in a consistent grid. The generous 600 ✕ 600mm tiles and 3050 ✕ 1240mm slabs allow greater opportunities for customisation. Blocks measuring 3050 ✕ 1240 ✕ 850mm are available on special request. We offer a honed finish, which gives a perfectly matte, natural expression of the marbles, or a polished finish, which gives a more saturated, reflective surface.

Marmoreal White tiles in two sizes, 600 ✕ 600mm and 300 ✕ 300mm.

Marmoreal White tiles in two sizes, 600 ✕ 600mm and 300 ✕ 300mm.

Marmoreal White Slab, 3000 ✕ 1200mm.

Marmoreal White Slab, 3000 ✕ 1200mm.

MARMOREAL BLACK TILES IN TWO SIZES, 600 ✕ 600MM AND 300 ✕ 300MM.

MARMOREAL BLACK TILES IN TWO SIZES, 600 ✕ 600MM AND 300 ✕ 300MM.

Marmoreal Black Slab, 3000 ✕ 1200mm.

Marmoreal Black Slab, 3000 ✕ 1200mm.

TYPESIZETHICKNESSFINISH
TILE300 ✕ 300mm20mm / 30mmHoned/Polished
TILE600 ✕ 600mm20mm / 30mmHoned/Polished
SLAB3050 ✕ 1240mm20mm / 30mmHoned/Polished

HOW TO BUY

Marmoreal tiles and slabs are made to order. Production lead time is typically 4 weeks. Clients in the Greater London area can often have a reduced lead time. Please contact us directly for details and availability.

We ship worldwide direct from our factory in Italy. Transport times depend on destination and method of shipping selected. Sea, road and air freight options are available. Once you have specified material quantity and final destination, we will source multiple quotes and pass along the option that best suits your needs and budget.

HOW TO MEASURE

SLAB: Marmoreal slabs measure 3050 ✕ 1240mm with a finished usable area of ±3000 ✕ ±1200mm and thicknesses of either 20mm or 30mm. We advise use of 30mm slab for work surfaces and 20mm for walls, cladding and floors. We do not sell partial slabs or fabricate custom slab sizes on a per project basis. This work would be carried out by a local tradesperson, likely a stone fabricator. We advise working with such a fabricator or architect to ensure calculations on material are correct for your project and to account for any overages necessitated by the design or installation of your project.

TILES: Tiles are available in 20mm and 30mm thicknesses and custom sized tiles are also available upon request. We advise a 10% contingency on top of the minimum quantity needed to account for any errors that arise during installation such as accidental breakage and to preempt any unforeseen circumstances that may present themselves.

CUSTOM ORDERS

Please contact us for enquiries about bespoke projects and items including alternative thicknesses for slabs and tiles and custom furniture.

CASE STUDIES

STORY

We were curious to see what kind of stone Max would create, how his rational design approach would transfer into materials and if he would work differently with a stone he creates opposed to one he takes from the earth.

Marmoreal by max lamb. Installation for Salone Del Mobile 2014.

Marmoreal by max lamb. Installation for Salone Del Mobile 2014.

Lamb’s ongoing Quarry series was the starting point for our collaboration with him. These sculptural works are characterized by their raw appearance, generous scale and honestly celebrate the qualities of a given stone’s natural shape, texture, and even its historical context.

We researched different man-made stone technologies and assessed which processes provided the most opportunity to achieve a desired result. A thorough survey of the existing products, past and present, was conducted to ensure originality.

After settling on making a precast terrazzo, extensive compositional studies followed and Lamb arrived at the idea of using large marble rocks as the bulk of the recipe to emphasize the inherent stoniness of human-made stone. This approach is in contrast to the typically small, speckled pieces of aggregate typical of terrazzo.

An early Marmoreal concept sketch by Max Lamb.

An early Marmoreal concept sketch by Max Lamb.

Approach to working with stone as it appears in Max Lamb's China Granite Project.

Approach to working with stone as it appears in Max Lamb's China Granite Project.

Rosso Verona, Giallo Mori, and Verde Alpi are the three Italian marbles featured in Marmoreal. Bianco Verona is used to create the white-background version, and Grigio Carnico is used for the black-background version. All of these marbles are natural materials and thus vary from batch to batch. The variations are part of the inherent beauty of natural stone and ensure that each piece of Marmoreal is entirely unique.

Marmoreal aggregates at processing factory in Italy

Marmoreal aggregates at processing factory in Italy

Italian marbles turned into Marmoreal. Rosso Verona, Giallo Mori and Verde Alpi.

Italian marbles turned into Marmoreal. Rosso Verona, Giallo Mori and Verde Alpi.

Rosso Verona, a red nodular limestone of the Jurassic period from northern Italy, is the prevailing stone in much of Veronese classical architecture. The entire city of Verona feels as if it is made from it. Its visual quality is the most predictable of the three featured stones, with colours ranging from earthy reds like dry clay to more saturated brownish reds characterised by fine circular patterns and stylolitic veins.

Giallo Mori is a bright, ochre-yellow marble from Trentino-Alto Adige, with both light and dark veins and the occasional small white quartz patches. The colour can range from pale yellow to dark Dijon mustard. The texture is often flat but can sometimes contain small white speckles that resemble a mass of microbes.

Verde Alpi is a traditional marble from Valle d’Aosta, known for its intense green colour and contrasting white quartz veins. The most varied of the three marbles, its particles can have a high quartz content, making the stone a glassy white or emerald green, or an absence of quartz, making it nearly black.

Bianco Verona makes up the background matrix for Marmoreal White. This traditional Veronese marble is characterised by its opacity and textural flatness, perfect attributes to serve as a canvas for the three primary marbles. Bianco Verona can vary in colour from off-white to cream, pink, or grey. In the Marmoreal development phase, it became clear that this stone provided better contrast than its more famous counterparts, Carrara and Botticino.

Grigio Carnico is the background for Marmoreal Black. This dark grey to black limestone from Alpi Carniche contains some pronounced white and grey veining, but on the smaller scale used to create a matrix, these qualities are homogenised and give the appearance of a galactic scenescape.

Terrazzo’s sustainable roots date back to fifteenth-century Venice, where craftspeople used waste materials — for instance local stone off-cuts and chips from the construction of palazzos — to make decorative mosaic-like flooring solutions. Eventually they began introducing glass, metals, and even concrete, all while consistently using local-material waste. Marmoreal acknowledges this history by using waste stone from Italian quarries, most of it locally sourced.

Quarry in Italy.

Quarry in Italy.

Archive image of early twentieth-century terrazzo making.

Archive image of early twentieth-century terrazzo making.